Image  |  via Josep Font

0 comments:

Image  |  island*atelier

0 comments:

Image  |  Alessandro Lucioni
We are always amazed at the sheer number of outfits Dolce + Gabbana can send down the runway at any given show. For Spring, the designers showed a total of almost 100 pieces all of which were impeccably rendered and styled. Their show was essentially a love letter to their homeland and la dolce vita, so they didn't want for inspiration. From the beaches of Portofino, to the leaning tower of Pisa, nothing was too kitsch or clichéd to be covered. With references to lemon orchards and gondolas, it was a fun and lighthearted collection that saw models pause mid-stride to take selfies on appropriately heavily embellished cell phones.

Classic shift dresses were shown but in beautiful form fitting shapes, some with abstract, painterly stripes. The black, widow's weeds they typically show were updated by the use of sheer lace overworked with what looked like crochet. The kimono-esque dresses were some of our favourite pieces. Also embellished: sunglasses, headbands and shoes which all featured heavy ornamentation.  Models carried baskets or handbags that were made to resemble cameras and, as a lighthearted touch, Dolce + Gabbana shopping bags.

0 comments:

Image  |  Daniele Oberrauch /Imaxtree
It didn't take long for Arthur Arbesser, whose eponymous collection we featured here earlier this year, to be noticed by the major players in the fashion industry.  Arbesser has come on board as Iceberg's new creative director and the change is evident.  Still sporty, the clothes featured knit pieces that were a mix of vertical stripes, solids and a graphic wave.  The collection was easy and comfortable and included practical outerwear.  We have to say we are loving the flats being shown on the runways of Milan and the shoes at Iceberg proved that flat does not necessarily mean a compromise on style.   

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown
Antonio Marras provides a masterclass in layering with this luxurious collection in subtle colours and dull metallics.

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown

Cloche hats set the scene for easy minimalism at Jil Sander.  Creative director Rodolfo Paglialunga was careful to toe the party line and produced a collection that did not stray from the house's aesthetic.

0 comments:

Image  |  Daniele Oberrauch
Highly stylised animal and camouflage prints opened the show at Bottega Veneta which, together with the wood panelling backdrop and runway, firmly placed the scene in the great outdoors.  The browns, greens and blacks of the clothes were lifted with pops of red and mauve and the use of knits and suede.  Our favourite feature was the use of cord as embellishment and designer Tomas Maier used the utilitarian item in a surprisingly artful way as straps on gowns or to create gathers, as drawstrings and patterns.

0 comments:

Image  |   Carlo Scarpato /Imaxtree
The traditional met the futuristic at Fendi where the roundness of puff sleeves and the curvy bubble of skirts and bloomers enveloped the models.  Yet another collection that referenced the duality of masculine and feminine, designer Karl Lagerfeld apparently did not focus on a single period in time and the result was an amalgamation of discordant elements rendered in a limited palette of red, white, blue and black.    

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch /Imaxtree
Monochromatic colours? Check. Nautical influences? Check.  Stars and graphic stripes? Check and check. 

This sleek and sophisticated collection from Max Mara checks all of our boxes with its artfully skewed coats and blazers, wide-legged trousers and pencil skirts.  Stars covered dresses (where they provided glimpses of skin), cozy jumpers and trousers.  Knot graphics snaked sinuously over dresses and separates while sailor trousers, double-breasted blazers and coats with brass buttons reinforced the nautical theme.  Tops with extra long sleeves that extended past the models' hands were layered and emblazoned with simple drawings of boats or lighthouses.

0 comments:

Image  |  island*atelier

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown
Let's close London with a look back as Anya Hindmarch evokes nostalgia in its purest form with a clever collection that featured branding and advertisements from years gone by.  By deconstructing the logos from such businesses as WH Smith, Boots and Mothercare and reducing them to their simplest forms, she has created a humorous (boots that actually say 'Boots' anyone?) and modern collection.  The results are sparse and graphic patterns on jackets, jumpers and bodysuits.  Pithy statements and more brand marks could also be found on backpacks, totes and clutches as well as the boots and sneakers. 

0 comments:

Image  |   Alessandro Lucioni
A largely sombre collection, the clothes were lifted by the injection of marigold and off-white and the use of gold piping and hardware on capes, coats and dresses.  Lace turned up everywhere, even on the men's clothes, and added much needed texture.  We felt some of the more delicate looks were spoilt by the addition of monogrammed black nylon backpacks that overwhelmed the outfits, but we continue to be intrigued by the footwear which veered between a comfortable, stretch mesh sandal and vertiginous heels.  Less than 24 hours after Claire Danes and Taraji P. Henson caused a stir by wearing chains in lieu of straps to the 67th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, Christopher Bailey showed for Spring what is likely to be a trend quickly adopted by the fast fashion chains*: heavy, metal links which were featured on Burberry's sandals and bags.

0 comments:

Image  |  Alessandro Lucioni/Imaxtree
Movement and the strength of ballet dancers' bodies were the inspiration for Roksanda's Spring collection which featured a restricted palette of blue, black, white and yellow.  This fluidity and beauty of motion was represented by light flowing fabrics, particularly on deconstructed coats and gowns made of hand-frayed silk panels.  Designer Roksanda Ilincic also showed and trousers so wide that they appeared to be skirts, wide, bell-shaped sleeves, loose strapless jumpsuits and sheer, layered dresses.  


0 comments:

Image  |  Alessandro Lucioni/Imaxtree
David Koma showed a mainly monochromatic palette tempered by that pale, blush pink that's becoming a popular counterbalance to stark black and white, as well as navy.  The  subdued palette was the perfect backdrop against which to showcase tailored, above-the-knee skirts and dresses and narrow, high-waisted trousers, many of which were intersected about the midriff by bandage-like belts that wrapped several times around the waist.  Leather bodices added toughness to fit and flare dresses with tulle skirts and once again shoulders were the focus, with the eye being drawn by the thin straps of tank tops, racer backs or asymmetric details. 

0 comments:

Image  |  Alessandro Lucioni
With Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as the theme running through this collection, the models were decked out in oversized aviators and sported patchwork safari suits in animal patterns and clashing colours which directly referenced the costumes worn in the film.  It was all about the wildlife represented by the animal skins, safari suits, foliage and the proliferation of brightly coloured insects which, in some instances, appeared to be crawling all over the wearer.  Laced openings, a trend that was practically non-existent in New York, was also employed to good effect on jumpsuits and sporty separates.

0 comments:

Image  |   Alessandro Lucioni /Imaxtree
Thank you London - you refuse to bore us!  

Next up is this stand out collection from Holly Fulton who paired embroidered and embellished cropped jackets with pencil skirts slit to the thigh or wide-legged trousers.  Evoking the sea and shore, the curl of the waves could be seen in the curve of the frills that adorned the front of form-fitting shift dresses and in the deconstructed, mosaic pattern on a-line dresses.  A modern three-dimensional starfish motif also turned up as a repeated pattern.  One of the more interesting ideas was the update on the traditional halter which Fulton wrapped around the front and offset to the side.

0 comments:

Image  |  Imaxtree
Interesting texture was the key to palmer//harding's collection where the clothes were constructed from loosely woven threads.  Our favourite looks included the smartly tailored shirts with slit or sheer shoulders that were paired with textured asymmetrical skirts and blouses with sheer panels, deconstructed sleeves and layers. 

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown

Temperley London looked to Central and South America for inspiration.  Dresses were embroidered in colours that were inspired by the images of Robert Polidori and covered in tropical motifs such as oversized palm leaves and parrots.  Tiered skirts, layers and ruffles abounded on easy, loose silhouettes.  

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch
A beautiful show from Simone Rocha.  There was a duality to the collection as it juxtaposed hard and soft, tough and sweet.  Lace sashes were strung across the chest of pretty feminine dresses like bandoliers and utilitarian pockets were patched on to the outside of skirts, dresses and trousers. 

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch
After a less than exciting week in New York, we are more than happy to say hello to London.  While  in the past London's shows have often seemed to be a little too much with performance overshadowing the clothes (we're looking at you Gareth Pugh), this year London looks like it has saved us from an exceedingly dull Spring.

Let's start with an old stalwart of the London shows: Jasper Conran who obviously sees Spring as a period of growth and rebirth. His collection was a veritable panoply of everything green and verdant. As the silhouettes were fairly uncomplicated featuring boxy shapes, crew necked tops and flared skirts, the fabrics and patterns were able to take centre stage. We have a soft spot for stripes and these could be found in abundance on the clothes and bags whether horizontally, vertically or performing a disappearing act through the use of inverted pleats. Clean, white separates provided a contrast while shine and sequins provided a stunning finale.

0 comments:

Image  |   Andrea Adriani /Imaxtree
Let's close out New York with a look at what Marc Jacobs will be offering for Spring.

To say there was a  lot to see in this collection would be an understatement.  The show could perhaps be described as a commentary on the American entertainment industry and the state of modern fame - be it horror show or circus.  Jacobs sent an extremely patriotic, glam rock collection down the runway.  In addition to literal takes on the red, white and blue of the American flag, the clothes were a bright and unapologetic mix of reds and blues (a combination Tory Burch also used to great effect in her Spring 2016 collection), often evocative of fireworks.  

Icons of Americana could be found everywhere and included the Playboy bunny, Mickey Mouse, Coca-cola, popcorn, Converse all-stars and Hollywood (in the form of movies and cinema) and a repeated print of the opera diva Maria Callas.  Some religious iconography was also thrown into the mix in the form of the sacred heart which appeared as an appliqué on one or two outfits for reasons probably only known to the designer.  Waists were cinched with Western-style belts and some of the flash was tempered by deconstructed knitwear and slouchy, oversized shapes.  There was an uncompromising feel in the footwear, the majority of which consisted of violently pointed pumps and boots.  

0 comments:

Image  |  Clover Canyon
More pretty follows in the form of this bright and clever collection from Clover Canyon.

0 comments:

Image  |  Cynthia Rowley
NYFW saved some of its best for last, including this pretty collection from Cynthia Rowley.

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch /Imaxtree
Anna Sui takes a trip  to the islands with this Hawaii-inspired collection.  Pineapples have become ubiquitous over the last few years, and Sui's collection will ensure that this remains unchanged for a few more.  This really literal take on hippie island life included undergarments that were designed to mimic tattoos and board shorts paired with jackets.

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch /Imaxtree
Volume and scale were played with at Delpozo all while staying true to the aesthetic of the line.  The collection was inspired by Gustav Klimt’s muse Emilie Flöge who discarded the corset in favour of a more easy silhouette which was evident in the curved, deconstructed shapes of the clothes.  As usual, colour was the collection's strong suit and the unusual but beautiful combinations were on point.  The show began with pieces rendered in the most delicate, ethereal pale green and evolved into stronger colours and colour combinations.  In addition to the usual beaded and embellished pieces, crochet and fringe evoking Flöge’s fondness for folklore were used liberally, turning up on kaftans and bustier tops.  Tulle and even gingham also made an appearance and there were some sheer pieces and cropped tops.  Standout looks included a floor-length, belted wrap that enveloped the model and full-skirted, embellished gowns. 

0 comments:

Image  |   Alessandro Lucioni /Imaxtree
We haven't been bowled over by New York Fashion Week this season (which you can probably tell by the relative lack of posts compared to previous years) but as the week comes to a close, we are encouraged by Proenza Schouler's offering which showed some beautifully rendered clothes.  

Inspired by the designers' trip to Cuba from where Lazaro Hernandez’s family hails, the very personal collection symbolised an unravelling or peeling away of layers which was evident in the draping of several of the pieces to expose shoulders and and in some cases the hipbone.  The ruffled and frilled dresses also evoked a latin feel as did the high-waisted trousers when paired with an off-the-shoulder top.  And can we say how much we love the shoes?  With a metallic, mid-height heel they provided the perfect compliment for the longer-length skirts and cropped trousers.

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown
Sleek sophistication in various shades of black and blush from Brandon Maxwell.

0 comments:

Image  |  Daniele Oberrauch /Imaxtree
Tory Burch went straight for kaftans and tunics with this luxe collection which relied largely Moroccan influences.  Rendered in vibrant colour combinations, the textured clothes featured wider sleeves, fringing and tassels as well as longer hemlines and the layering of trousers under dresses.

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown
Pretty separates and gowns with delicate touches and embellishments form the basis of this romantic collection from Carolina Herrera.

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch

Edgy florals (from a distance the pattern almost resembled animal print) and lots of shine were the key trends at Monique Lhuillier.  Her designs featured bright, primary colour-blocking and bell-shaped structured pieces with pixelated, watercolour florals and lace overlays.  Asymmetry was key and could be found in the diagonal draping of sprigs of flowers across the body as well as in the hemlines. The tunic-over-trousers trend which has taken off tremendously this season was also given a fair amount of exposure as were her models' bare shoulders. 

0 comments:

Image  |   Daniele Oberrauch

Smart suiting and streamlined silhouettes from Zhang Toi.  Sleeves continue to be voluminous for spring/summer 2016 and here, the streamlined a-line shapes of tunics, whether over trousers or as stand-alone pieces, featured touches of lace and crochet that added colour and texture to the otherwise streamlined looks. Show-stopper gowns with capes or full skirts from gathered tulle added drama.  Shoulders were also important here with jewelled yokes or breastplates highlighting that part of the body.

0 comments:

Image  |  Unknown
Sophisticated sporty looks from Giulietta featuring texture and embellishment, graphic patterns and contrasting fabrics.  While there were some sheer pieces with nude underlay and circular embellishments, the emphasis was on the shoulder and midriff and these were highlighted by off-the-shoulder tops or via cutaway designs.  The simple form, fitting skirts, dresses and culottes - often with inverted pleats - were intersected by contrasting piping and details.

0 comments:

Image  |   Andrea Adriani/Imaxtree
An easy, wearable collection from CG that referenced several trends that are current right now including cropped tops and trousers, laced-up flats and mid-length skirts.   Shirt dresses were slit to the waist, while shirts featured open backs and sleeves were left unfastened.  Appliqués added interest.

0 comments:

Image  |  Imaxtree
If we were asked to sum up this collection in one phrase, we'd have to say 'Edwardian Prairie Chic'.

There is a growing trend towards more demure dressing and this unrepentantly feminine collection from Zimmermann has embraced it.  Featuring lace - lots of it - ruffles, frills and tiers, the flat-fronted bib blouses were nipped in at the waist over flirty, flared skirts.  Necklines were high and arms were kept demurely covered, but as a counterbalance hemlines stopped above the knee and the expanse of leg gave the collection a youthful and fun feel.  

0 comments:

Image  |   Andrea Adriani
Marissa Webb  showed a contradictory collection featuring a mix of disconnected ideas: floral and utilitarian, feminine and military, plaid and lace that somehow worked well.

0 comments:

Image  |   Andrea Adriani
It's that time again when the hordes descend on the fashion capitals of the world to preview the looks for the upcoming season.  New York Fashion Week kicked off on Thursday and as usual, we'll double distil the proceedings by featuring our favourite looks from our favourite shows.  First up, the layered looks of Ohne Titel.

0 comments:

Image  |  Primitivo
These Nomad tables are part of a collaboration between object and furniture designers Abel Cárcamo and Carlos Leon Astorga.

The minimalist side tables are crafted from Lenga (the native wood of Patagonia, Chile) and aluminium finished with an electrostatic paint.  The three-legged tables are comprised of just a few pieces and the clean lines are understated but striking.

0 comments:

Image  |  Heath Ceramics
This beautiful pixilated pottery is a collaboration between Natalie Chanin and Heath ceramics. The subtle design is described as an intersection of stitch and clay and results in a carefully crafted, modern dinnerware line.

0 comments:

Image  |  Hay
Danish design studio Hay is behind this set of sleek gold-handled scissors. The Phi scissors are made from plated carbon and come in two sizes making them a functional yet stylish addition to any office or kitchen. 

0 comments:

Image  |  Puphaus
If the taste of your house runs to the modern and minimalistic, there's no reason why your pet's abode should be any different and with Puphaus, this can easily be done.   The modern dog house is made in the US by Atlanta-based design studio Pyramid Design Co. from Western Red Cedar and Portland Cement Board.  Designers Roy Fleeman and Zach Griggs took their cues from modern home design and the naturally-derived materials were chosen to blend into any outdoor setting.  The house dismantles for easy transportation and can be assembled in five steps without any tools.

0 comments:

Image  |  Adidas Originals
Here is another collaboration between Adidas and the prolific entertainer/artist/designer Pharrell Williams.  This limited capsule collection includes the ubiquitous Stan Smiths and the unisex Superstar LIL’ jacket all rendered in vintage fabrics Williams found when visiting Marché Saint Pierre in Paris.  The Jacquard Pack shoes and jacket are available in two colourways: gold and pink embroidery on turquoise and red, gold and green embroidery on cream.  Williams designed the inside of the shoe in a bright pattern that contrasts with the more traditional exterior and the sneakers also feature yellow de-bossed, vintage-like logos on the heel tabs.

0 comments: