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Here is one last look back at some of our most popular posts. With a strong focus on design and not fashion, click on the name of each post to revisit the original entry. Thanks for a great year and see you in 2018.

10. This Little Piggy
9. Tactile Time
8. Zero Sum Game
7. Bermuda Beer
6. Gucci Kids SS2017 Collection
5. Margherita Missoni x Pottery Barn Kids
4. Hold Tight
3. Bamboo Bottle
2. Light Stick
1. The Pink House


It's been a quieter than usual year and as it comes to a close, let's revisit some of our favourite local and regional posts of 2017. Click on the links below to be taken to the article.


BCXSY, an Amsterdam-based interdisciplinary collaboration between designers Boaz Cohen and Sayaka Yamamoto, was commissioned by renowned textile brand Kvadrat to create a design using their Canvas fabric, and the Catwalk Bench is the result. The Bench takes an uncommon approach to upholstery whereby the textile is displayed as a revolving loop - reminiscent of a manually operated conveyor belt - rather than resting static and in place. Gradually the various colourways of the Canvas textile appears and moves across the surface of the bench like a vivid fashion show, highlighting the tonal relationships and harmonies within the collection. The textile possesses the characteristic of providing a variety of different impressions, depending on the distance and angle from which it is viewed.

The Catwalk Bench was shown as part of the My Canvas exhibition at Somerset House, London for the London Design Festival.

The grey No.3 timepiece from TID.

From TID, a Stockholm-based watch brand founded in 2012 by Ola E. Bernestål, Petrus Palmér and design studio Form Us With Love's Jonas Pettersson and John Löfgren, comes the No.3 an exploration of the Swiss-produced material TR90.

"TID" is Swedish for time: a precious currency to spend on things you love and the group invests theirs on perfecting watches from their studio in Stockholm. TR90 is a durable and lightweight plastic that gives the case an unadorned look whilst maintaining a monochromatic appearance. There isn't any overt branding to detract from the simplicity of the design; in fact the only noticeable branding is impressed into the side of the unit. The solid-coloured watch is available in 38 mm and comes in a range of colours with a matching Silicone wristband that adds a durable dimension to the collection.

Pichulik Anahitra necklace in Bermuda.

We've featured South African jewellery line Pichulik several times in the past, but now we are pleased to advise that the gorgeous line is now available in Bermuda at the new concept store Merch

The rope-based line references Bermuda's nautical history with a twist. The bespoke range of accessories - consisting of necklaces, earrings and bracelets - have been elevated by the use of semi-precious stones, gold-plated beads and threads that reflect its African and Middle Eastern inspiration. Pichulik is designed for bold and brave women. Shy and retiring types need not apply.   


How is this for a beautiful item that can be enjoyed all year round? This free-standing calendar artfully combines a solid brass easel with premium quality paper to bring you a beautifully unique desk or tabletop display. It comes with twelve local scenes to choose from: Bermuda flora or Bermuda island life, all set in a uniquely modern design.

The brass calendar is available from Merch

Ulric + Arly linens and place settings

Ulric + Arly is a Barbadian textile and clothing design studio run by visual artist Mark King. King uses geometric and wrought iron elements in the series which is inspired by King's grandfathers: Ulric, a diligent educator, and Arly, a charismatic blacksmith. Its first limited edition homeware collection of napkins, placemats, and tea towels features patterns from King’s “Convertibles Are Better Than Warrants” series. Here the lines are coded and each design corresponds to phrases related to the recent global financial crash and ongoing banking scandals. Each piece in the collection is made from 100% cotton and is individually hand-printed.

Ulric + Arly is available in Bermuda at Merch.

Hawkins Island, Bermuda

A perennial party place, Hawkins Island, Bermuda a private island is made up of 25 acres of lush woodland reserve and a private beach located in the Great Sound has been given a sophisticated makeover and turned into a luxurious resort. The island resort consists of a Main Villa that sleeps 8 guests and consists of an upper two bedroom master suite and two lower one bedroom units, and the Guard House that can accommodate a further 8 guests. Set in a lush wooded backdrop, visitors to the island can pass the time exploring its many walking and running trails, swimming in the calm waters of the Great Sound or relaxing in the ocean-side pavilion with its sweeping ocean views. 

BLOOM planter by By Making

The Bloom plant boxes from design studio By Making were launched in Trinidad on December 9. The metal planters are a twist on the red metal mailboxes often seen on that island. In Bloom, the utilitarian item has been converted into a thing of beauty while retaining its practicality. Bloom can be used in several different ways: staked into the ground, hung, or in its saucer. However you use it, this contemporary twist on a well-known object is designed to bring a a spot of bright colour to your house or garden.

Made in Trinidad and Tobago using time-tested processes, Bloom is available in three colours: orange, teal and yellow.

Merch concept store St George's, Bermuda

Merch, a new concept store located on the ground floor of Stiles House, King’s Square in St George's, had its soft opening during the annual National Trust Walkabout on December 1.

The store will carry a variety of items that are intended to cater both to the local population of Bermuda and its visitors alike. The mandate of the store will be to carry a number of unique and interesting items that have been sourced internationally and regionally including men’s and women’s clothing and accessories, jewellery and gift items. Merch is interested in the promotion of local talent and will also carry items by local designers and creatives that are not sold anywhere else on the island. In this regard, they are presently the sole retailer of clothing and accessories by Art Pays Me, the line by Bermudian graphic designer Duane Jones who now lives and works in Halifax, Canada.

Setting up the shop in the Town of St George was no accident. The creative team behind Merch had long been looking for ideal premises at various locations Island-wide. They eventually settled on the bright and airy location on the corner of King’s Square. Stiles House, which was once variously a private home, a hotel and even a tavern, was thought to be the best option as the location was the ideal juxtaposition of stately, historic building with the modern, spare feel of the interior which is designed to show off, rather than compete with, the products that will be carried.

Merch is open in the run up to Christmas although some minor work still continues on the outfit of the interior. The store will have its official opening in the Spring of 2018.

Burgandy Fendi wallet with plexiglass studs

We’re starting our annual holiday countdown off with a special gift for you.

At the top of our list to Santa this year is this gorgeous wallet from Fendi with its colourful plexiglass studs. The wallet has a slim profile and comes with a chain strap so it can do double duty as a clutch or a cross-body bag - which is good because we think it’s too pretty to hide. And just for you, Lusso is offering all i*a readers a discount: just use the code "IALOVESLUSSO' to get up to 15% off* your next purchase.

This ceiling light collection designed by by Julia Kononenko of Kononenko ID is made of lacquered ash and aluminium. Its simple silhouette is elevated by the elegant combination of contrasting materials and varying shapes. The combination of wood with light-coloured metal and chestnut brown leather gives the design a warm and sophisticated aesthetic. The Nut light was designed for MZPA which is a community platform that celebrates Ukrainian designers and creative furniture design. MZPA embraces originality, attention to detail, wood-based materials and passion for the craft.

Detail of the OFF-WHITE x IKEA rug collaboration
Image | Virgil Abloh
IKEA have been prolific with their collaborations in 2017 including the highly-anticipated line with HAY we featured earlier this week and the limited edition JASSA collection. We recently came across this teaser image for the upcoming release of a line with OFF-WHITE's Virgil Abloh that features a relatively conventional-looking rug that has been tagged with "KEEP OFF" in large, white letters. Abloh has also put his own spin on the IKEA “FRAKTA” bag which has been reimagined in cardboard. We can't wait to see what comes next.
Colour Wood side tables designed by Scholten & Baijings for Karimoku New Standard

Inspired by the traditional Japanese wood joint technique yatoi-sanetsugi, this series of 15-sided, polygonal barrel side tables called Colour Wood designed by Scholten & Baijings for Karimoku New Standard is a new look at traditional craft techniques and the characteristics of thinned wood. The tables come in four styles and three sizes, each with their own combination of colours, height and diameter. The base is made of individual laths that are connected at intricate angles to form a rounded tapered platform on which the multi-sided tabletop rests and, except for the all-pink table, come with coloured textile inlays. Transparent colours and graphic patterns printed on the tabletop represent contemporary design superimposed on traditional craft techniques.

QM weather system

Here, in the summer, the weather is pretty predictable: sunny and hot. Now the seasons are changing, having a little more information on the world outside your window is helpful. This is where the QM Weather device would be incredibly useful. Not just great to look at, the QM Weather device is an IoT weather forecast product that has been developed as a collaborative work of Quantum and Kooyox. It gives an immediate overview of the weather outside with a quick glance at its minimalist screen. Crafted from a wooden base with illuminated icons, QM Weather creates a striking visual impact and, with its aesthetically pleasing design, will fit in well with any decor.

YPPERLIG desk lamp

Released earlier this year YPPERLIG is a collaboration between IKEA and the Danish design company HAY. Mette and Rolf Hay - the husband-and-wife duo behind the design company which was founded in Copenhagen in 2002 - drew inspiration from the spheres of architecture, fashion and art, and this resulted in pieces that have a straightforward, functional design and an universally aesthetic appeal. The YPPERLIG collection celebrates the beauty of basics. It includes sofas and coffee tables as well as smaller accessories like cushions and stationery.


Looking for the perfect gift for the coffee-lover in your life? This elegant and minimalistic espresso machine is an enjoyable way to get your day started. The Newton Espresso Coffee Maker's straightforward design uses no electricity, requires little maintenance or cleaning, and has no pumps or intricate inner workings. The lever-press operation also means the Newton is silent to use. The high-quality seals, the piston design, and leverage system create sufficient pressure to produce the perfect espresso. The amount of force that can be applied to the lever can be varied in several ways: the force applied to the handle, the quantity of coffee used in the basket, the tamping pressure, and the coarseness of the grind.  

The portable espresso machine takes up very little countertop space and is even wall-mountable. The wooden base, handle and tamp have been finished with a two-part acid catalysed lacquer used for bench tops to provide an easily cleaned, stain resistant and hard wearing surface. The other components (except the stainless steel removable coffee basket) have been machined from aluminium with a powder coated finish and the cylinder with an anodised, food safe finish.

Green Jijibaba Sweater


Jijibaba is a first time a brand created by furniture designers Jasper Morrison and Jaime Hayon.

We're big fans of Hayon who is a prolific sculptor and designer, and whose work blurs the lines between art and design. His creations span diverse media and can be found not only in hotels, restaurants and retail establishments, but also in art exhibitions and museum collections around the world. Conversely, Morrison looks to find the exceptional in the world of the ordinary. He is a firm believer that design should have an almost invisible presence in the end product and that an atmosphere of naturalness in things is more important than a designer’s signature. A very different ethos to Hayon's distinct style.

Jijibaba’s creative directors have split the task of designing the collection - which includes overcoats, shirts, jackets, trousers, t-shirts, sweatshirts, sweaters, cardigans, scarves, and wallets - into two. Pieces numbered 1 to  21 have been designed by Hayon, while the remaining 19 items came from the mind of Morrison. The new line will be sold exclusively at Dover Street Market, London, New York, Ginza and Singapore, and reflects each designer's unique creative spirit and identity but uses ideas and approaches that emanate from the designers’ grounding in industrial design.

Jijibaba is intended to be an evolving collection of high quality and functional clothing created by a community of designers. Following the launch of these initial items, Morrison and Hayon will be responsible for selecting other designers to contribute to the collection in the future.


The days are getting shorter, the nights are getting longer and this is the perfect time for this lantern which was inspired by and designed to honour the Danish tradition of “hygge”. The simple orb light rests on a steel frame that doubles as a handle. The best part? The portable lamp is cordless and rechargeable and also comes with a USB port for supplementary power.


We're fans of Byredo's scents, but their bags are coming in a close second. Accelerated Culture, the capsule collection of handbags and small leather goods inspired by drag racing are the result of a collaboration between the perfume house and photographer Craig McDean. Launched at Paris Fashion Week in September, the bags were shown with never-before-seen photographs and a film by the photographer. While the basic, geometric shape of the original line of leather goods, Nécessaire de Voyage, that debuted in 2015 remains, the bright colours and shiny patent leather directly reference the images that were the subject of McDean's book called I Love Fast Cars and provide the line with a fresh injection of style.

Catherine Hyland's Maddens Wind Farm portrait
Image | Catherine Hyland/NPG
The annual Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, a leading international photographic portrait competition, celebrates and promotes the best in contemporary portrait photography. The Prize has established a reputation for creativity and excellence with works submitted by a range of photographers - both leading professionals and talented amateurs - and the most exciting emerging artists. This year, those selected for inclusion were chosen from 5,717 submissions entered by 2,423 photographers from 66 countries. One of the prize winners was Catherine Hyland whose Maddens Wind Farm from the series Wait-and-See Pudding with Patience Sauce was taken on the small Caribbean island of Nevis.

The exhibition of fifty-nine works that accompanies the Prize is being held at the National Portrait Gallery, London from 16 November 2017 to 8 February 2018.

Colour Stool by Karimoku New Standard is a simple design brought to life by the grid lines on the stool's seat. The lines are in fact grooves. During the manufacture process, the seat's surface is spray-painted and any excess colour is sanded away manually leaving only the thin stripes. The shape of the undersurface of the seat and the joints between the seat and the legs are made according to the highest standards of Japanese craftsmanship. Colour Stool is compact in size and suitable for even the smallest living spaces. Handy and lightweight, this stool can easily be moved between the entrance hall, the kitchen, the bedroom or the living room.


We love the primary colours and textured surfaces of these 3-D illustrations from the Personal Collection of Peter Tarka.

This hotel was just too stunning not to feature. Located on the coast of San José del Cabo, the Hotel Mar Adentro is inspired by, built around and located next to water. The resort is entirely surrounded by a shallow reflective pool which gives the illusion of a floating oasis. At its centre is an oval swimming pool lined by custom teak lounges overlooking the sea. A dark concrete path parts the waters, leading to a 40,000 square-foot beach club where guests are served on built-in sunbeds from the food truck kitchen. Every guest room offers Poliform furniture, walk-in closets, covered terraces, and floor-to-ceiling glazing. Their minimal design and muted palette allow the ocean to be the main focus.

Swedish designers Stoft Studio were intrigued with the idea of the old and the new, the ancient and the modern and it was from this that the Whittle Away collection was born. Consisting of an armoire and a smaller cupboard that can be wall-mounted, the exterior is made up of planks of wood that have been stripped back like the bark of a tree to reveal the bright natural algae paint colours underneath. As the outer skin unfurls, something new and unspoilt that has lain dormant is revealed. The result is a paired-down minimalism combined with a certain colourful homeliness, the simple form of which is evocative of handicrafts of the past.

Whittle Away was commissioned for the exhibition What’s your DNA? and presented during Dutch Design Week 2017.
Graeme Mortimer Evelyn illustration

We came across the drawings and sculpture of Graeme Mortimer Evelyn, a Jamaican multi-media visual artist, musician and curator recently, a surprising fact given that he has won several large commissions and his artwork appears in numerous municipal buildings, sites of memory and places of worship as well as being displayed and collected in Princeton University's Center for African American Studies, Cornell University, Kensington Palace, The Royal Commonwealth Society, Museum in Docklands, Gloucester Cathedral, Watershed and M-Shed Bristol.

Evelyn's varied body of work is a subversion of the institutional. He comments on cultural social identity, politics and language, describing these narratives as forming “when fragments of relation, memory, society, identity and modernity, which seem disparate at first, come together to form a whole”. Evelyn has developed a reputation for creating work that is situated in municipal buildings, sites of memory and places of worship that subvert these settings and philosophies. His intention is that his art acts as a catalyst; attracting new audiences to seek alternative dialogues and challenging questions, enabling a democratisation of public spaces. Much of his work deals with Black history, reparation and reconciliation as well as societal conflict. In 2011, Evelyn was Artist-in-Residence at St. Stephen’s Church Bristol and commissioned to create a large scale permanent contemporary altarpiece entitled the Reconciliation Reredos. Set within one of the oldest churches in Bristol, historically significant as the harbour church that blessed every merchant slave vessel before their voyage; the Reconciliation Reredos is a contemporary artwork of universal reconciliation, that responds to the church’s past, reflects the voices of the city today while representing the potential of the future. The work has established Evelyn as the first ever Black British Artist to complete such a commission in Europe.

In addition to his art, Evelyn also works with film such as the video essay he made in 2007 entitled The Two Coins: Meditations on Trade. This poignant, factual and objective work was filmed staging imagined historical reenactments within UNESCO heritage sites and locations in Ghana, Mali, Malawi and the UK, documenting the dormant history of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade as silent meditation.

Evelyn continues to develop a new bodies of work. He is currently commissioned as Artist-in-Residence by the Diocese of London to create a Reredos - permanent large scale contemporary altarpiece - entitled The Eternal Engine for St Francis at the Engine Room in Tottenham Hale, the first new Anglican church to be built in the capital in almost 40 years.


KAWS, Uniqlo, and Peanuts are back again with another highly anticipated collaboration. Out in the US today, November 20 and in the UK on November 24, the monochromatic collection consists of what Uniqlo does best: traditional street wear including crew-necked tee-shirts, sweatshirts and hoodies in black and white but also includes bags and a completely black Snoopy plush in two sizes that is sure to be one of the most coveted pieces. Part of Uniqlo’s LifeWear concept which reimagines various pop culture icons, the limited colourway gives the collection a certain gravitas as the line is designed to appeal to as wide an audience as possible. In keeping with Uniqlo's moderate price range, items will retail between $10 to $40.


The Piper Range by GibsonKarlo for DesignByThem pairs indoor quality and charm with outdoor durability, creating a range that is visually light, distinctive and versatile. The designers wanted to create an outdoor range with the look, feel and quality of an indoor set. The backrest and seat of the chair can be interchanged with various colours and upholstery finishes creating a unique look. The Piper table with its standard compact laminate surface is available in various sizes - from café to dining - and finishes. The contrasting colours accentuate the design, and the strong lines highlight and frame the design in the same way windows and architraves are highlighted in buildings.

Made from 304 stainless steel with a powder coat finish, the Piper Range is designed to withstand outdoor elements whilst providing comfort with its subtle curves. 


We love these moulded rubber bags from the Spring 2018 collection of Xiao Li.

A sophisticated, monochromatic collection from Aquilano.Rimondi who looked to painter and sculptor Joan Miró for inspiration for the colours used. There was an abundance of tailored pieces and an interesting use of topstitching and texture whether it be via the loose knit layers draped over a dress or dresses in pleated patent leather. Torsos were defined by huge, cinched belts at the waist or hip.

We hesitated to feature this collection but something about it drew us in. Perhaps it was the fact that Bermudian model Lily Lightbourne headlined the show or maybe that her flower of choice was the distinctly tropical Hibiscus, one that doesn't often appear in high fashion circles. In any event, we loved the juxtaposition of the island flower on the thick coats and jackets or the fur pouches that were slung around the models' waists. It was a pretty heavy collection - literally and figuratively - for Spring that featured pretty patterns and a judicious use of fur.

We aren't into whimsy or overt femininity, but something about the freshness of Luisa Beccaria's collection really drew us in. She showed breezy printed chiffon dresses, embroidered tulle  and flowing skirts in stretch cotton ticking stripe. The fact that the feminine silhouettes were combined with masculine influences might have helped. Here, floral patterns were tempered with graphic dots and stripes all of which helped to moderate what could have otherwise been an overwhelmingly saccharine collection.

Sportmax has been doing athletic wear long before it became ubiquitous. As the more relaxed, diffusion branch of Max Mara, this history was still very evident and for Spring 2018 they saw no need to deviate showing dresses and separates in technical fabrics combined with a ribbed knit. Parkas, shorts and flowing skirts were paired with sweaters and leather bombers with striped, elasticated ribbed cuffs and hems. Skirts were split or raised for better mobility and we particularly loved the sheer dresses lined with floral prints. 

Poolside lounging from Pucci which featured their trademark print on flowing caftans, maillots, trousers and separates as well as a gorgeous dress with feathered sleeves.

We have a love-hate relationship with Prada. While we recognise the importance of the brand and its role as a trendsetter, we are often left underwhelmed by the actual collections. Sacrilege we know. 

This collection honoured the militant woman, and therefore it made sense that the tailoring - in the form of beautifully cut jackets and coats - took centre stage. These were shown with or without sleeves and in double- or single-breasted versions and included a gorgeous tweed coat with embellishments across the chest and on the shoulders. We also took note of the shiny plastic polka dotted Macintoshes. Arachnids crawled over chests and could be found on jumpers and vests. One obvious recurring theme was the use of cartoons and manga by female artists that were screen printed over shirts, some of which were worn backward or buttoned up the back. As with all of her collections, there was a lot to unpack from her use of textures to prints (be they zebra or leopard spot) to embellishments, none of which in theory should go together, but by some form of strange alchemy managed to.

In return to the 1980s and the days of power dressing, stripes met sheer layers in this exuberant collection from Fendi. A few of the dresses featured a rambling, abstract floral but most mixed bold lines and layering. For the most part, the looks had cutouts at shoulder and chest. There was also a return to the days of conspicuous consumption with the prominent placement of the Fendi logo on coats and bags.  If this collection is anything to go by, come Spring the Fendi woman will be ready for business.

Alberta Ferretti opened the show with maillots in unassuming black. The bodysuits were an inauspicious start to a fairly expected collection that consisted of draped dresses with Grecian influences, but deep cut necklines and exposed torsos provided these floor-length gowns with a modicum of interest. Slouchy knit dresses and separates followed, but the real showstoppers consisting of subtly coloured chiffon dresses embellished with feathers, evening separates (shorts provide the most comfort without sacrificing style) and lamé trousers brought up the rear. The looks were completed by lightweight nylon windbreakers - the perfect thing to stave off those Spring showers.
We were early fans of Mary Katrantzou who generated so much excitement when she debuted. Her designs were noteworthy if not groundbreaking at the time and when a new designer emerges that strongly off the block with an identity that is fully-realised, they can run the risk of becoming cliché. For several seasons we feared this was the route Katrantzou was taking, but recently she appears to be making a concerted effort to move out of the comfort zone that saw her repeating her mirror-image digital prints in various permutations. She has course-corrected, bringing a freshness and new direction to her collections which were previously heavily reliant on her old tropes.

For Spring 2018, Katrantzou opened with voluminous dresses and skirts and then moved on to woven column dresses with fringed hems. In a collection that referenced air and lightness (bags were inflatables) and was inspired by childhood, these silky parachute skirts and dresses were not short on volume. There were still some digital prints, but they were countered by the use of stripes which, together with her choice of technical fabrics and the use of bungee cord fixtures at the neck and waist, added athletic touches. In addition to the paint-by-numbers prints, Katrantzou's standout pieces included neoprene dresses that were embellished with tiny, plastic Hama beads. The beads provided texture and interest and proved to be a more clever way of creating the check pattern that is being evoked everywhere this season. The show closed with pretty dresses in oversized broderie anglaise.

This deceptively simple collection of ombré layered, hand-tied and draped pieces was presented by Phoebe English for Spring 2018. The limited collection consisted of monochrome wrapped tulle and cotton clothes that were tucked and folded.

This far-from-basic black, gender-fluid collection from Neo Design was saved from boredom by the use of layering, cutouts, and tonal textural elements such as the rope-like embellishments that wound their way around the body.

Hands as a motif showed up in a number of collections leading us to believe this micro trend may become a macro one over the next few months. Nowhere was this theme more obvious than at the Triinu Pungits show where models were literally enveloped in arms and hands bestowing on them virtual hugs as they navigated the runway. Using a strictly monochromatic palette ensured continuity between the different looks which veered from printed bodysuits to open fronted, relaxed coats, to slouchy sweaters with ubiquitous frills on the sleeve. 

Edeline Lee stuck to a limited palette of neutral beiges, greys and a pink just a shade darker than the ubiquitous millennial. Frills, which have been so popular this season, graced the shoulders of sweaters and sleeves. The collection was unadorned for the most part, so these textural elements were an important way of adding interest. There were a few structural and tailored pieces including a double-breasted jacket and trench coat. Buttons, another feature that keep reoccurring in the Spring collections, also provided some colour contrast and embellishment on an otherwise unadorned collection that included simple shirt dresses, flutter sleeves and flared skirts as well as delicate smocking on blouses and dresses. Our favourite looks included long trousers tied at the ankle that were paired with a sweater with oversized bows on the shoulders.

Pretty volume in coats and dresses embellished with floaty feathers and pleated hems were the theme at Sharon Wauchob who went big for Spring. Cocoon-shaped dresses and coats in gabardine and metallic fabrics were the standout items as were prettily toile printed and pleated dresses. Asymmetry was also prevalent with off-centred coat openings and a scarf-like element that turned out to be an exaggerated collar. Feathers were used often, either exuberantly covering dresses or more subtly peeking from hems. 

A largely impractical but visually stunning collection from Gareth Pugh that was more sculpture than fashion. Presented as part of a movie screening, Pugh showed a series of blood red, ink black and brilliant gold pieces that were structurally severe and very powerful. 

This was an unexpectedly favourite collection from the London shows. We all know Spring weather can be variable and unpredictable, and this indecision was embodied perfectly here. Sweaters were paired with almost-there lace trousers and skirts, the latter of which were overlaid with black organza.  Lupfer also showed boldly patterned pieces: trousers and skirts were teamed with graphic sweaters, and big pants with cardigans. Structured shirt dresses in pinks, blues and oranges were covered with silhouetted monkeys and shared space with pretty embellished floral dresses. The result was a collection that perfectly matched whimsy and wearability.

Temperley made her name with dresses and continues here with what she knows. This unabashedly feminine collection felt more like a resort collection as models walked the runway with turbans covering their hair and oversized sunglasses evocative of holiday destinations. Flowing, patterned dresses were cinched at the waist with leather belts. Tiers, ruffles and some embroidery added texture and interest. The only evidence of any intention to evolve and move in a new direction were the trousers that were shown as evening wear.

The movie The Royal Tannenbaums entered the cultural lexicon years ago and the look and feel of that movie has inspired many imitators and not just in fashion. Holly Fulton's presentation of highly patterned botanical prints were mixed with graphic checks and animal prints with the zebra being the natural choice and its image showed up on sweaters, skirts, dresses and bags.  


We love David Koma for his minimalist take on fashion that still manages to be glamorous and not dowdy. This collection follows his usual methodology: simple, streamlined and often body-conscious shapes. Any patterns are kept to a minimum and consisted of classic vertical stripes. Koma also mixed his trademark monochrome with primary colours and yet the clothes are far from boring.

In a time where fashion-mad sportsmen can command hundreds of millions of dollars, it is no wonder that fashion has looked to return the interest.  Cut-outs, ruffles and sequins ensured a lively collection. Ruffles flowed asymmetrically from shoulder or hip. Some of the more striking pieces included a frilled leather skirt, a bomber jacket with lace sleeves and a lace sweatshirt with matching trousers. The mix of technical fabrics with luxurious ones worked well.